The Big Ben

While I did not visit the Kew gardens due to the weather or traveled far out to visit Eltham Place at Greenwich which architecture I was keen in… I did however take in some sights in about London.

Firstly there was the London Eye which was built in 1999 and was the world’s tallest ferris wheel for awhile… but for now our Singapore Flyer has taken that title. There’s nothing too special about the Eye but it is one of the unmistakable symbols of London just like the Eiffel Tower in Paris… it gives people pleasure to be able to be taken high up and to view the city in it’s entirety below.

Right across from the London Eye is the Palace of Westminster and my favorite landmark of all! The Big Ben! I still remember how excited I was to see it for the first time years ago. The clock tower had character and grandeur. This is the world’s largest 4 face chiming clock tower that is celebrated it’s 150th birthday in 2009. At the base of each clock face is the inscription DOMINE SALVAM FAC REGINAM NOSTRAM VICTORIAM PRIMAM, which means O Lord, keep safe our Queen Victoria the First.

The Big Ben is most frequently seen on the BBC news and is used as to welcome the New Year during the countdown celebrations.  The clocks’ chime is also broadcast on for Remembrance Day which falls on 11th November at 11pm. Every year the clock starts the nationwide (including the royal family) 2 minutes silence in honor of those who died in the War especially WWI.

It’s just an overwhelming feeling when I think about the constant change in humanity and how Father Time is always constant and always there. Moving forward regardless if it was good or bad. How insignificant we as individuals can be in the face of eternity.

The importance of the troops that have died in the World War is rather close to heart in the UK. All around the places you can see many monuments dedicated to them and even till today… you’ll find dedications with garlands red poppy flower (which is the symbolic flower of the military veterans) all around.

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

— Lt.-Col. John McCrae
Lastly, if you are the sort of reader that get bored with facts and trivia (lol… I’ve a thing for useless information), you can skip the reading and go straight into the short video that summarizes everything.

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Comments

  1. fly~
    January 8, 2009 / 2:50 pm

    u look amazing!!! i’m just curious… who helped u to take photos? u’re traveling for leisure or for work? 🙂

  2. fly~
    January 8, 2009 / 2:50 pm

    u look amazing!!! i’m just curious… who helped u to take photos? u’re traveling for leisure or for work? 🙂

  3. January 8, 2009 / 4:41 pm

    fly~,

    Usually family or friends or whoever there with me. I travel for a bit of both actually =)

  4. January 8, 2009 / 4:41 pm

    fly~,

    Usually family or friends or whoever there with me. I travel for a bit of both actually =)

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